Complete Guide to Your KeyBank Routing Number (Plus a Full List)

Complete Guide to Your KeyBank Routing Number (Plus a Full List)

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  • Post last modified:May 26, 2020
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If you are a KeyBank customer and do any kind of online banking, you will need your KeyBank routing number. That number will be different based upon where you live. In this post you will find a list of KeyBank routing numbers which you will need for wire transfer and direct deposit.

This number is important because you need your routing number for several types of transactions:

  • Direct deposit
  • Wire transfers
  • Automatic bill pay
  • Processing checks

These are just a few examples, but there are many more.

How to Find Your KeyBank Routing Number

There are many reasons you might need your routing number. For example, you might work from home or complete surveys that pay through PayPal. Whatever the case may be, there are many reasons you may need this number handy.

And that number is even easier to find when you have all of them in one place. That’s why I decided to put this list together – so that you will always know where to look. Most of the time, you don’t even need these pesky numbers – until you do.

Luckily, you have your routing number here so that you aren’t scrambling to try to find it. Below, you will find a list of the routing transit numbers (RTN) for KeyBank as well as the wire transfer routing number.

KeyBank Overview

KeyBank may not be as heavily advertised as some banks, but they have been around a long time. They were founded in 1825 in Albany, New York under the name of Commercial Bank of Albany.

After its founding, there isn’t much history to report on KeyBank until 1865, when it was reorganized and renamed National Commercial Bank of Albany. The bank was again renamed in 1971 to First Commercial Bank.

It wasn’t until 1979 that the name “Key Bank” would appear when the bank was renamed yet again to Key Bank Inc. Later, that name would be stylized to KeyBank.

This nine digit number found at the bottom of a check, among other places. This a unique number that cannot be used by any other bank. However, KeyBank has many different routing numbers depending on the state.

List of Routing Numbers

In this section, you will find a complete list of KeyBank routing numbers. Because they can be different based on your state in addition to the type of transaction, it can be helpful to have a centralized list.

For example, if you do your banking in Pennsylvania, you will have the following routing numbers:

  • Ordering checks: 222370440
  • Wires and ACH: 021300077

In the below table is a list of all of the KeyBank routing numbers. Note that I have bolded ACH/wire transfer routing numbers that are different than those for ordering checks.

StateRouting Number – ChecksRouting Number – ACH, Wire Transfer
AK125200879125200879
CO307070267307070267
CT222370440021300077
FL041001039041001039
ID124101555124101555
IN041001039041001039
ME011200608011200608
MA222370440021300077
MI041001039 041001039
NYRefer to check/online banking021300077
OHRefer to check/online banking041001039
OR123002011123002011
PA222370440021300077
UT124000737124000737
VT211672531211672531
WA125000574125000574

Ways to Find Your Routing Number

Any kind of electronic funds transfer (EFT) or direct deposit will require you to know your routing number. Of course, you would never want money held up because you don’t have your routing number available.

For that reason, we will go through all of the different ways you can find your routing number.

1. On the KeyBank Website

One of the most obvious ways to find your routing number is by checking the KeyBank website. When you log in to key.com, you will find a section that includes a list of all of the routing numbers listed by state.

In fact, you will find a fill list on their website. That is very convenient, especially due to the fact that some states have separate routing numbers for ordering checks vs. wire transfers and automated clearing house (ACH).

2. KeyBank Mobile App

KeyBank has a mobile app, and many banking institutions will make this information accessible in the app. While logged into your account, check your account information to see whether the routing number is listed.

To get started, download the KeyBank mobile app for iPhone or Android.

3. At the Bottom of a Check

Also, you may check the bottom of a negotiable instrument such as a check. While personal checks have become less common, they are nonetheless a useful tool when doing business. This number may differ if you have more than one bank account opened in multiple places.

Specifically, at the bottom of the check, you will see the routing number printed in magnetic ink character recognition (MICR). You may also see the check number and a number identifying your account.

4. Online or “Offline” Statement

Whether you use online banking or not, you will receive a statement every month. The only difference is that if you use online banking and opt for paperless billing, you will see your statements while logged into your account.

However, if you do things the old fashioned way, you will receive a printed statement in the mail every month. Either way, on that statement you may find your KeyBank routing number.

Importance of Your Routing Number

KeyBank routing number is a code you need to have when transferring money online. Having the correct number will help the person or bank on the other end of the transaction properly identify you.

In doing so, they will also know the region in which your checks were printed and the bank of which you are a customer. Even within the context of frugal living, your Keybank routing number is important.

Routing numbers were first created by the American Bankers Association (ABA) in order to help identify customers. Checks could be printed in many different places and many banks had similar names. Because the routing number was a unique code, it could ensure there would be no confusion.

Many banks have more than one routing number, but two banks can never have the same one. This is a unique code that only one bank uses.

To correctly verify the right routing number for your account, you must know the state in which you reside as well as the type of transaction. In some states, your KeyBank routing number may be the same for all types of transactions. In others, that number can be different for ACH transfers and wire transfers vs. ordering checks.

There are many types of online transfers which require your KeyBank routing number. For example, moving money into an IRA, savings account, or buying prepaid Visa cards will require this information. You will need your KeyBank ABA routing number for any of these transactions.

In addition, the routing number on the bottom of your check in many cases cannot be used for wire transfers. In some states, the KeyBank routing number is the same for all transfers; in others, the wire transfer routing number is different.

Check the list above to be sure you know the correct routing number for your transaction.

Although these routing numbers were traditionally meant to assist with routing of checks, they are still relevant today. Various types of online transactions require them and so it is important to have your routing number available.

How Your Routing Number Works

While it may look like your routing number is just a bunch of random digits, that isn’t the case at all. The first four numbers actually identify it has a KeyBank routing number. No other bank will have that prefix.

After that, the second set of four digits is the number the ABA assigned to your bank. Once again, that number is unique to your bank. The last number is a check digit, also known as a checksum, which validates the routing number. If the routing number is invalid, the check digit will not be able to verify its validity.

Account Number vs. Routing Number

Remember that when you look at your printed check, you will usually see several numbers printed at the bottom. All of these numbers serve a unique purpose.

The first set of numbers will be the routing number. That will always be a nine-digit number and it is unique to your bank. However, if you have accounts in more than one state with KeyBank, you will probably have two different routing numbers.

The next set of numbers you will see at the bottom of the check is usually your account number. Unlike the routing number, which is always nine digits, your account number will be 10-12 digits.

And also unlike the routing number, your account number is completely unique to your account. There will never be another account within your bank that has the same account number, even if you open another account in your name.

Both numbers are unique identifiers, but the routing number identifies your bank and where your checks originated, whereas your number for your account is unique only to your specific account.

Conclusion on KeyBank Routing Number

Your KeyBank routing number is a unique nine-digit code you will need for ACH wire transfers and many other types of transactions online. This unique code can be found in many places but is easiest to find at the bottom of a check. You may also be able to find it on a bank statement.

This number tells the bank on the other side of the transaction know where your checks originated and also that you are a KeyBank customer. In doing so, you will be able to eliminate confusion about the bank of which you are a customer.

However, now you also have this post to be able to reference. Having your routing number in one easy-to-reference document makes it much easier and simpler.

Hopefully, this has made it easier to find your routing number. Let us know what you think and if you have any questions.

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Hey there. My name is Bob Haegele and I'm an expert at frugal living and saving money. I’m also an EV enthusiast and have recently become mostly-vegetarian. Another thing I started doing recently? Dog walking. I’m working toward financial independence making money via my own ventures. Interested in starting a blog of your own? Check out my post on starting a blog.

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