How to Find Your Bank of America Routing Number

How to Find Your Bank of America Routing Number

Last updated October 21st, 2019.

10 minute read

Your Bank of America ABA routing number is a critical number for various types of banking transactions. In this article, you will find a full list of Bank of America routing numbers.

About Bank of America

Currently headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, Bank of America is the second largest bank in the United States. The Bank of America name first appeared in 1923, but the company’s history goes all the way back to 1784. Along with JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Citibank, it is among the largest banks in the country.

The Bank of America routing number is a nine-digit code that helps you with ACH transfers in addition to ordering checks. This number is found at the bottom of a check and online as well.

The routing transit number or RTN uniquely identifies the financial institution with which you bank. Also sometimes called an ABA number, these numbers help eliminate confusion when transferring money.

How Bank of America Routing Numbers Work (+ a List)

Any time you have to do any sort of banking, such as with your local bank or credit union, you will need to know your Bank of America routing number.

These numbers may seem funny or difficult to understand. But the reality is that they aren’t that complicated.

If you have ever done any kind of online banking or wire transfer, you have probably needed your Bank of America routing number. If you want to transfer money, you will need to know what a Bank of America routing number is and where to find it.

List of Bank of America Routing Numbers

Below, you will find a quick reference to find all of your Bank of America routing numbers.

You will find each state followed by the routing number that goes with it. In a couple of states, you will find that that are multiple routing numbers for different areas.

For instance, you will notice that there are several different routing numbers for accounts opened in Illinois:

  • Illinois, Chicago Metro: 081904808/0071103619
  • Illinois, North: 071000505
  • Illinois, South: 081904808

Below is a complete list of all Bank of America routing numbers.

StateBank of America Routing Number
Alabama051000017
Alaska051000018
Arizona122101706
Arkansas082000073
California121000358
Colorado123103716
Connecticut011900254
Delaware031202084
District of Columbia054001204
Florida, East063100277/063000047
Florida, West063100277
Georgia061000052
Hawaii051000017
Idaho123103716
Illinois, Chicago Metro081904808/0071103619
Illinois, North071000505
Illinois, South081904808
Indiana071214579
Iowa073000176
Kansas101100045
Kentucky051000017
Louisiana051000017
Maine011200365
Maryland052001633
Massachusetts011000138
Michigan072000805
Minnesota071214579
Mississippi051000017
Missouri, East081000032/101000035
Missouri, West081000033
Montana051000017
Nebraska051000017
Nevada122400724
New Hampshire011400495
New Jersey021200339
New Mexico107000327
New York021000322
North Carolina053000196
North Dakota051000017
Ohio051000017
Oklahoma103000017
Oregon323070380
Pennsylvania031202084
Rhode Island011500010
South Carolina053904483
South Dakota051000017
Tennessee064000020
Texas, North111000025
Texas, South111000025/113000023
Utah051000017
Vermont051000017
Virginia051000017
Washington125000024
West Virginia051000017
Wisconsin051000017
Wyoming051000017

You may have noticed that while there are numerous different Bank of America routing numbers, there are also several states with the same number.

This is not as strange as it may seem at first. That’s because routing numbers actually correspond to where your checks are printed. So, what this tells us is that all of these states have their checks printed in one place.

At the same time, some states listed have more than one Bank of America routing number. That means they have checks printed in more than one location.

How to Find Bank of America Routing Number

There are several ways to look up your routing number. Although there is a list of them above, you may want to know how to find your routing number if you don’t have the list handy. These places include:

  • Routing number on check
  • RTN via online banking
  • Routing number on Bank of America app

If you want to know where to find your Bank of America routing number, here are the places you can look:

Routing Number on Check

One of the quickest and easiest ways to find your routing number is at the bottom of a printed check. At the bottom of your check you will see three sets of numbers.

The first set of numbers you will see is the MICR routing number, printed in magnetic ink. This is the number you will need.

The second set of numbers is the account number. This is a unique identifier only assigned to your checking account. These are usually 10-12 digits.

Then the last set of numbers is one you probably will not need. This is just the check number, used to identify that individual paper check.

RTN Via Online Banking

Another way you can find your routing number is while logged into your Bank of America account. While you are logged in, you will be able to find your routing number in your account information.

If for some reason you have having trouble locating it, you can always contact support. This is a very common number that all customers need, so they should be able to help you right away.

The Bank of America contact number is 1-800-933-6262.

How to Find Bank of America Routing Number on App

Bank of America also has a mobile app you can use for all of your online banking. Since the American Bankers Association or ABA routing number is available via online banking, you can also use the mobile app to find this number.

With the world becoming increasingly mobile, it only makes sense that mobile banking would allow you find your routing number.

Bank of America ABA Routing Number

Routing numbers are something we really cannot do without in the banking world. However, their original purpose may be different from how we think about them today.

The American Bankers Association (ABA) invented routing numbers or ABA numbers in 1910 to help track printed checks. At the time, there were many banks with similar names, and this was causing a lot of confusion in the banking world.

By creating routing numbers, the ABA was able to make check cashing and other banking transactions safer, more secure, and less prone to errors. The Federal Reserve also needs these numbers to process fedwire funds.

How Do Bank of America Routing Numbers Work?

Routing numbers might seem difficult to understand, but they are actually fairly simple once you consider a few key components. We’ll go over that and more in this article.

There are many technical terms for the routing number even though most of us just call it by that name. One such term is the routing transit number or RTN.

These numbers help banks and financial institutions identify your account. In particular, they indicate the bank at which you opened the account. In doing so, banks can process your transactions more securely and reliably.

Account Number vs. Routing Number

When you open an account with Bank of America, you obtain an account number. You also have a routing number which corresponds to your bank. Together, both numbers help identify you and your bank when conducting business transactions.
 
Note the difference here: the account number is specific to your account while the routing number corresponds to your bank.
 

Your routing number is a nine-digit code; it will always be nine digits. Your account number, on the other hand, will usually be 10-12 digits, but the length varies.

What is an Account Number?

This is one of the important numbers you will need for direct deposit, send money via wire transfer, and ordering checks. These numbers work together with your routing number to uniquely identify your account.

If you have multiple bank accounts, you will have a different account number for each one. However, if every account was opened at the same bank (in the same location), they will likely all have the same routing number. Account numbers are only assigned to one single bank account.

What is a Routing Number?

The routing transit number or RTN is often simply called the routing number. In some cases, it may be called the ABA number for the American Bankers Association. That is because the ABA manages all routing numbers.

You will see the routing number in printed your paper check. Typically, there are three sets of numbers on the bottom of a check. The first set is your routing number printed in magnetic ink (MICR).

The second set of numbers if your account number and the third set is the check number.

You will need your Bank of America Routing number for transactions such as:

  • Electronic payment
  • Domestic wire
  • Ordering checks
  • Automatic payments

Note that you may also see your routing number in another form. In the upper-right corner of the check, you might see a number in the format XX-XXX/XXXX. This is also a routing number in what’s known as fractional form.

However, you will probably not need to know your fractional form routing number. Usually, you will only have to know the number at the bottom of the check.

Importance of Routing Numbers

Routing numbers are important because we can’t do banking online without them. Your Bank of America routing number is a code that is necessary for money transfers.

For example, if you would like to set up direct deposit or make automatic payments on your mortgage, you will need your routing number. Thus, you will need the correct, valid routing number to initiate a transfer of money.

Also note that the routing number on your checks will not work for wire transfers. When processing a wire transfer, you will need a separate routing number. You will also need a BIC code if it is an international wire transfer.

You will have to verify your routing number before conducting any such transactions. To find this number, reference the table above corresponding to your state.

There may be multiple routing numbers for one bank within one state. However, no two banks have the same routing number.

Your Bank of America routing number is important for a number of financial vehicles. These include IRAs, prepaid cards, and savings accounts. Routing numbers also identify the financial institution when you send or receive money.

They are also used for Automated Clearing House (ACH) deposits, paying bills, and depositing checks.

This makes it easier to identify you and, in the case of routing numbers, your bank. Because it eliminates such confusion, the process is faster and more secure.

Are All Routing Numbers the Same?

No, there are many routing numbers which thousands of different banks use. However, routing numbers are not unique to one account or customer. Those who have checks from the same bank may have the same routing number.

Some banks have numerous routing numbers; others do not. Routing numbers identify where checks were printed. If a bank only has checks printed in one place, all routing numbers will be the same for its customers.

Wire Transfers and International Transfers

Although you will just have one Bank of America routing number for most transactions, wire transfers are different. There is a specific wire transfer number for Bank of America.

You will need this number if you want to do any kind of wire transfer with Bank of America. In addition the the wire transfer number, there is a code you need for international transfers.

Bank of America SWIFT Code

In addition to the number you will need for wire transfers, there is a separate code for international transfers.

This is what is known as a Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) code. There are two Bank of America SWIFT codes.

  • For incoming wires in US dollars, the SWIFT code is BOFAUS3N.
  • For incoming wires in any currency other than US dollars, the SWIFT code is BOFAUS6S.

Bank of America recommends using the SWIFT code for US dollars if you do not know the currency.

Conclusion on Bank of America ACH Routing Number

Having your Bank of America ACH routing number handy is necessary for all kinds of money transfers. Without this number, it’s unlikely you will be able to successfully send and receive money.

Your routing number is a nine-digit number which can be found at the bottom left of a check or through online banking. You can also find it in the list above. You will need this number for bill pay, wire transfers, and automatic bill pay.

Make sure you keep this list handy if you ever need to find your Bank of America routing number. You may want to bookmark this page so you can come back to it later.

Hopefully you found this information useful and it answered all of your questions. If not, let us know what other questions you have in the comments.

Related:

Hey there. My name is Bob Haegele and I blog about personal finance here at The Frugal Fellow. I’m also an alternative energy and EV enthusiast and have recently become semi-vegetarian. Another thing I started doing recently? Dog walking. I’m now doing that as a side hustle and loving it! I’m now working toward financial independence making money via my own ventures. If you’d like to work together, send me an email.

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